FAQs


1. What does FRIDA stand for?
2. What is a FRIDA grant?
3. How does FRIDA define its Feminism?
4. Who are the Young Feminists?
5. What is FRIDA’s position on supporting mixed and transgender groups?
6. What kinds of organizations can apply for a FRIDA grant?
7. What are FRIDA’s Grantmaking Priorities?
8. Which geographical area does FRIDA support projects in?
9. How much should we apply for?
10. Do you provide grants for more than one year?
11. What does general support mean? Can we include overhead costs in our budget?
12. What is the application deadline?
13. In what languages can we apply?
14. We are not a formally registered group. Can we still apply?
15. What are the monitoring and evaluation requirements for grantees?
16. What is the decision making process?
17. Can we apply again if we are unsuccessful?
18. Can we apply for more than one grant?
19. Can we submit more than one application?
20. Do grantees have the opportunity to meet with FRIDA fund staff or with other grantees?
21. What is FRIDA’s relationship with the Association for Women’s Rights in Development (AWID)?
22. What is FRIDA’s relationship with the Central American Women’s Fund (FCAM)?
23. What is FRIDA’s relationship with the Tides Foundation?
24. What is FRIDA’s relationship with the Young Feminist Wire?
25. What is the role of the FRIDA Advisors?
26. How are FRIDA Advisors selected?

1. What does FRIDA stand for?
Flexibility, Resources, Inclusivity, Diversity and Action. These are the core values of the fund. These values reflect the feedback and recommendations received from hundreds of young feminist activists that participated in the Association for Women’s Rights in Development (AWID) 2010 global survey. These values were agreed in November 2010 by the Fund’s advisory committee.

2. What is a FRIDA grant?
A FRIDA grant includes both a financial grant, opportunities to network and connect with other young feminist activists working globally, and capacity building support intended to strengthen the participation and leadership of young feminist activists.

3. How does FRIDA define its Feminism?
FRIDA uses the term feminism to refer to individuals working within the women’s movement or in other social movements to promote and work towards the safety, equality, justice, freedom and full spectrum of rights and dignity of girls, women and other marginalized groups. We choose to use a feminist approach in our grantmaking and work overall in an effort to go beyond gender binaries and the limitations associated with these.
4.Who are the Young Feminists?
FRIDA recognizes that different groups and individuals will have alternative definitions of their feminism and that in many instances groups and individuals working in particular socio-cultural contexts will struggle to self-identify as feminist. We acknowledge these challenges and will support those initiatives and organizations whose political agenda, vision and values are in line with FRIDA’s.

FRIDA defines young feminist activists as young people from across the gender spectrum committed to advancing gender equality and women’s rights. Based on the understanding that fundamental discrimination occurs within our societies, young feminists are determined to challenge, address and change the root causes of these existing inequalities, rights violations and injustice.

FRIDA recognizes that there are limited funding opportunities for young women beyond the adolescent girls age category (10-19 years). On that basis, FRIDA seeks to fill the gap experienced by young feminist activists in the 18 -30 age range. We accept that the age range covered includes young people who in many contexts are already social adults (mothers, married, income earners, voters, income earners etc) and that there is an inadvertent cultural and class bias in conceptions of what makes a “young” activist. However, FRIDA is committed to supporting groups that demonstrate a solid commitment to feminist activism and movement building doing our best not to reinforce an artificial concept of ‘youth’ as an identity. On that basis FRIDA will not turn down an application solely on the basis of age.

5. What is FRIDA’s position on supporting mixed and transgender groups?
As a fund FRIDA believes that fundamental discrimination against women occurs within all societies. We also acknowledge that individuals who do not comply with society’s limited definitions of gender identity and expression continue to be marginalized and discriminated against in various ways (often extremely violently). In keeping with our values and politics that prioritize inclusion, diversity and our feminist principles of equality, justice and human rights we stand by our position to support groups (including trans groups) that are marginalized simply for being who they are. FRIDA will support initiatives founded and/or led by young women or transgender youth. FRIDA will not however, provide funding to initiatives led by young men even if they self define as feminists because of our limited resources that are dedicated to address the fundamental inequality and discrimination faced by young women and young transgender peoples.

6. What kinds of organizations can apply for a FRIDA grant?
Organizations, networks and formations that focus on young women and transgender youth rights can apply for a grant from FRIDA. In order to be eligible for FRIDA funding, you must be:
• A group founded or led by young women/transgender youth under 30 years of age;
• A group (including informal/non-registered groups) or networks that are committed to advancing and defending young women’s rights from a feminist perspective globally;
• A group committed to improving the lives of young women and transgender youth at local, national, regional or international levels;
• A group that demonstrates a solid commitment to inclusive organizing, collective action and movement building and
• A group that demonstrates both passion and professionalism in their work, and that is unique, creative and brave.

7. What are FRIDA’s Grantmaking Priorities?
FRIDA mobilizes resources for, and supports groups and initiatives led by young feminists working to advance women’s human rights and social justice. We know that young women are organizing across a broad range of human rights, environmental, and social and economic justice issues. On that basis, FRIDA does not outline specific priorities as a means of ensuring flexibility and openness and ensuring that the views, voices, needs and priorities of these groups are supported.

8. What geographical area does FRIDA support projects in?
FRIDA supports groups based in the Global South (Africa, Asia and the Pacific, The Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean and Central and Eastern Europe and Commonwealth of Independent States).

9. How much should we apply for?
Grant amounts can be anywhere between $1,000 – $5,000 USD.

10. Do you provide grants for more than one year?
As a start-up initiative, FRIDA is only able to provide grants for one year. We anticipate that as we grow and build our own resource mobilization capacity that we will be able to provide more longer term grants.

11. What does general support mean/Can we include overhead costs in our budget?
Yes, you can include justifiable overhead costs in your overall budget. FRIDA recognizes the value of general support and encourages groups to prioritize resources according to their own needs. For example some groups may consider using FRIDA funds to cover staff, administration, or organizational costs while others may use funds to support establishing infrastructure or project related costs. FRIDA is committed to funding feminist activism and will cover costs that allow groups to engage in their work more effectively.

12 .What is the application deadline?
Every year FRIDA launches one call for proposals, if you want receive news  about our next grant cycle you can subscribe to our mailing list or follow us on Facebook/Twitter.

13. In what languages can we apply?
Applications can be submitted in English, French, Spanish, Arabic and Russian.

14. We are not a formally registered group. Can we still apply?
Yes, Many newly established young feminist groups struggle to become registered and for others it is a political decision not to register themselves (avoiding NGO-ization of their work). FRIDA is open and committed to supporting these groups.

15. What are the monitoring and evaluation requirements for grantees?
FRIDA will work with grantees to design a participatory youth-friendly approach to monitoring and evaluation. FRIDA is working closely with women’s funds and other youth-led organizations to develop less complicated M&E processes and methodologies for the kind of social change work that we are supporting.

16. What is the decision making process?
Once applications are received, FRIDA staff and advisors conduct an initial screening to filter those that do not meet the criteria. Following the initial screening, summaries of shortlisted applications are then made available for all applicants with a request that they vote for their top choices and give comments on their choices (groups are not permitted to vote for their own proposals). In voting, we ask applicants to keep in mind what they think is important for the promotion and defense of the rights of young feminist activists, as well as FRIDA’s core values and goals. After receiving the votes, the results are tallied and the final selection of grantees is announced.

17. Can we apply again if we are unsuccessful?
Yes, you may apply as many times as you would like.

18. Can we apply for more than one grant?
No, you cannot apply for more than one grant per grantmaking period. You may apply for grants in subsequent application rounds. While we are committed to provide continuous support to grantees, given our limited funding at this point preference will be given to applicants who have not yet benefited from the fund.

19. Can we submit more than one application?
No, only one application per organization may be submitted at a time.

20. Do grantees have the opportunity to meet with FRIDA fund staff or with other grantees?
Yes. FRIDA is committed to responding to the needs expressed by young feminists worldwide for linking, connecting, and networking with other young feminists from other regions, countries and organizations. Thus, grantees will have the opportunity to meet with other grantees and partners.

21. What is FRIDA’s relationship with the Association for Women’s Rights in Development (AWID)?
In the first two years, AWID acts as one the organizations providing direction and oversight of FRIDA. The idea for a young feminist fund first emerged in April 2008 at a meeting on funding coordinated by the Association for Women’s Rights in Development (AWID) in Marrakech, Morocco.

22. What is FRIDA’s relationship with the Central American Women’s Fund (FCAM)?
The Central American Women’s Fund (El Fondo Centroamericano de Mujeres, FCAM) has extensive experience employing an inclusive model of supporting young women-led activism in Central America. For this reason, AWID and FCAM partnered together to support the development of FRIDA. As incubating organizations – AWID and FCAM are providing financial and in-kind support to FRIDA.

23. What is FRIDA’s relationship with the Tides Foundation?
The Tides Foundation acts as the financial home for the Fund in its incubation stage. This means that the Tide Foundation handles the logistical aspects of FRIDA’s grantmaking but that the substantive decision-making and priorities remain independent.

24. What is FRIDA’s relationship with the AWID’s Young Feminist Wire?
One of the FRIDA’s main objectives is to generate knowledge around young feminist activism. AWID’s Young Feminist Wire is an online platform created in March 2010 as a space for young feminists – especially young women – working on women’s rights and gender equality around the world to connect, learn and share information. The Wire offers a space where women’s rights advocates of all ages can learn more about young women’s activism and make connections with younger activists. FRIDA is closely connected with the Wire in learning about the work being carried out by young feminist activists globally.

25. What is the role of the FRIDA Advisors?
FRIDA’s current advisors are all young feminist activists under 30. Advisors play a leadership role in FRIDA by providing advice and participating in discussions regarding the vision, concept, strategic direction and priorities of the Fund together with AWID and the Central American Women’s Fund.
Specific Responsibilities include:

1. Design and Conceptualization: This involves close collaboration with the FRIDA coordinator and other relevant internal stakeholders to refine the vision, mission and primary goals of the Fund.

2. Resource Mobilization and Communications: This involves support to FRIDA coordinator around implementation of the Fund’s resource mobilization strategy including some regional fundraising efforts.

3. Alliance-building and constituency development: This involves supporting the FRIDA coordinator in building new relationships with key strategic allies including donors, women’s funds and other regional and international feminist organizations. Advisors are involved in building the Fund’s constituency through active outreach and information dissemination.

4. Design and Coordination of Grantmaking: This involves working closely with other advisors and FRIDA coordinator to develop and implement processes for grant-making; Developing and implementing effective grant-making mechanisms.

26. How are FRIDA Advisors selected?
Selection of Advisory Committee members takes into account: regional representation, thematic expertise, knowledge of specific constituencies and skills in areas such as communications, capacity-building, monitoring and evaluation, management of grants etc. It is based on commitment to feminist activism in these contexts, and desire to participate in the Fund’s growth and development. Current Advisors will support FRIDA during the incubation period after which new advisors will be selected. Opportunities to apply for the Committee will be publicized on the Young Feminist Wire Platform and through our networks, and other social media platforms.